Biology of Sport
pISSN 0860-021X    eISSN 2083-1862
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Journal Abstract
 
DIFFERENCES IN GROUND CONTACT TIME EXPLAIN THE LESS EFFICIENT RUNNING ECONOMY IN NORTH AFRICAN RUNNERS
Jordan Santos-Concejero, Cristina Granados, Jon Irazusta, Iraia Bidaurrazaga-Letona, Jon Zabala-Lili, Nicholas Tam, Susana María Gil
Biol Sport 2013; 30(3):181-187
ICID: 1059170
Article type: Original article
IC™ Value: 10.00
Abstract provided by Publisher
 
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between biomechanical variables and running economy in North African and European runners. Eight North African and 13 European male runners of the same athletic level ran 4-minute stages on a treadmill at varying set velocities. During the test, biomechanical variables such as ground contact time, swing time, stride length, stride frequency, stride angle and the different sub-phases of ground contact were recorded using an optical measurement system. Additionally, oxygen uptake was measured to calculate running economy. The European runners were more economical than the North African runners at 19.5 km · h-1, presented lower ground contact time at 18 km · h-1 and 19.5 km · h-1 and experienced later propulsion sub-phase at 10.5 km · h-1, 12 km · h-1, 15 km · h-1, 16.5 km · h-1 and 19.5 km · h-1 than the European runners (P<0.05). Running economy at 19.5 km · h-1 was negatively correlated with swing time (r=-0.53) and stride angle (r=-0.52), whereas it was positively correlated with ground contact time (r=0.53). Within the constraints of extrapolating these findings, the less efficient running economy in North African runners may imply that their outstanding performance at international athletic events appears not to be linked to running efficiency. Further, the differences in metabolic demand seem to be associated with differing biomechanical characteristics during ground contact, including longer contact times.

ICID 1059170

DOI 10.5604/20831862.1059170
 
FULL TEXT 509 KB


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